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Review of Peer Support Activity in the Context of Self-Directed Support and the Personalisation of Adult Social Care

 

A report prepared for the Department of Health

 

 

National Centre for Independent Living

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Councils are on course to miss a target of moving 30% of adult social care recipients on to personal budgets by March 2011, according to a survey.

Figures published by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and the Local Government Association< show that there are currently about 170,000 personal budget holders, which is an increase of 77,000 on a year ago.

Local authorities expect there to be 376,000 personal budget holders by March 2011, which is the end of the three-year transformation programme.

However, this represents about 22% of users on the basis of the government's national indicator 130, which measures the number of service users on personal budgets, and defines about 1.5 million people in England as eligible for them.

However Adass argues that a third of those included as eligible do not appear "directly relevant to the offering of a personal budget".

The survey, based on a survey of 152 councils, showed that around 950,000 people receive ongoing council-funded care and support on a weekly basis. One-in-seven of this core group are now in receipt of a personal budget, which would rise to 40% next year based on Adass and LGA figures.

Personal budget funding levels have now reached almost £900m of council expenditure with 74% of this delivered as a direct payment, the survey revealed.

It showed that 96 councils committed more than 10% of their community services budgets through a personal budget and 40 committed 20% or more of such funds.

Read Community Care and Unison's exclusive research on the progress of the personalisation agenda.<

How is personalisation working in practice? Have your say on CareSpace<.

Related stories

Personalisation grant saved from cuts, ministers confirm<

Progress on personalisation not matched in workforce<

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/2010/05/27/114598/councils-set-t...<

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kevin
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The government has confirmed that local authority funding to support the personalisation agenda will not be cut this year.

In a meeting with government ministers and officials, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Care was told the £237m social care reform grant would remain in place, allowing English councils to continue with their plans for the transformation of adult services.

Speaking to Community Care, Adass president Richard Jones said this commitment was "reassuring at a time of some resource anxiety".

It was now time for ministers to think about how to move the agenda forward with a "Putting People First part two" programme to succeed the current agenda, which concludes next year, Jones said.

He added: "It's positive that the Department of Health and care services minister Paul Burstow was able to keep the social care reform grant ring-fenced and out of the piece."

However Jones acknowledged that this comes with "the toughest spending review within living memory due in the autumn" and the impact on public sector spending would mean doing more for less.

Concerns remain over possible cuts this year to other grants including the learning disability campus closure programme, the Aids support grant, the homelessness grant, the stroke strategy and the carers grant.

It is thought it will be at least another week before there is any clarity from the Treasury, but it is becoming clearer that the largest cuts will take place in programmes that have a capital element.

Personalisation consultant Jeremy Cooper, of iMPOWER, said the coalition government's commitment to protect the social care reform grant was good news.

But he added the onus would be on local authorities go beyond the target of having 30% of adult social care users having a personal budget by April 2011, to the aspiration, set out by the previous government, to have all users on personal budgets by 2012.

He said: "Councils must keep their eyes focused on delivering truly transformed social care, not just ticking the milestone box in April 11. Get used to talking about 100% on personal budgets by April 2012 not 30% in April 2011."

Related stories

The state of personalisation<

Personalisation grant stays ring-fenced but cuts fear remains<

£20m for disabled children's respite breaks as Child Trust Fund axed<

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/2010/05/27/114597/personalisatio...<

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kevin
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There are wide regional variations in English councils' progress towards meeting a series of personalisation targets, a survey has found.

While eight of the nine East Midlands councils are very confident they will meet the "milestone" of having 30% of care users on personal budgets by April 2011, just four of the 15 South West councils are similarly confident.

The findings come from an Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and Local Government Association survey of progress on the second year of Putting People First<, the 2008-11 Department of Health programme to personalise car

The five milestones< - the others cover commissioning, working with service users, prevention and providing information - were published last year by the DH, Adass and the LGA, setting expectations of progress for the final 18 months of Putting People First.

The survey also found that, nationally, councils were on course to miss the 30% milestone for personal budgets for all service users<. However, when only users receiving ongoing care and support are considered, the target is likely to be met.

Andrew Cozens, the Local Government Association's strategic lead for adult social care, said differences in councils' progress reflected different approaches to personalisation.

For instance, he said some had made slower progress on personal budgets because they had "got bogged down" in setting up resource allocation systems, which determine the value of personal budgets.

Overall, least progress had been made on the milestone on prevention and cost-effective services, with 17% of councils saying they were "fairly unlikely" to meet it by April 2011.

The milestone states that councils should have evidence that strategies to shift care from acute to preventive services had released savings overall, and that the costs and benefits of the strategies had been apportioned across the whole system of care, including the NHS.

Again, there were regional variations in progress, with eight of the 14 West Midlands councils, but just one of the 12 North East councils, saying they were "very likely" to meet the milestone.

Read the full results.<

Read Community Care and Unison's exclusive research on the progress of the personalisation agenda.<

How is personalisation working in practice? Have your say on CareSpace.<

Related stories

Councils set to miss personal budgets target<

Personalisation grant saved from cuts, ministers confirm<

Personlisation milestones<

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/2010/05/27/114604/regional-dispa...<

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anonymous (not verified)
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Prioritising need in the context of Putting People First: a whole system approach to eligibility for social care - guidance on eligibility criteria for adult social care, England 2010

This guidance is issued under section 7(1) of the Local Authority Social Services Act 1970 and replaces Fair access to care services - guidance on eligibility criteria for adult social care which was issued in 2003. This guidance will need to be applied from April 2010.

 

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/Publicati...<

anonymous (not verified)
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Welcome to the Putting People First: Transforming Adult Social Care website - the online hub of information, news, events and resources for the Putting People First initiative.

http://www.puttingpeoplefirst.org.uk/

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Evaluation and learning 2008-2009

This page contains an electronic version of In Control's Third Phase Report, which describes the learning from our work in 2008 to 2009 and looks ahead to the next phase.


The report contains the following:

Foreword, by Richard Jones, Executive Director of Adult and Community Servies, Lancashire County Council


Introduction, which describes the changing context for Self-Directed Support and Personalisation since 2008.

Part One

Part one of the report is divided into four chapters:

Chapter one, focuses on what is required to prepare for Self-Directed Support, and includes the lessons we have learnt from the process in adult social care departments.


Chapter two, looks at the basic tools required for change, and examines in particular the issues in relation to Resource Allocation, Suported Self-Assessment and Support Planning.  The chapter concludes with a section on Direct Payments and Personal Budgets.


Chapter three, looks in more depth at issues for the commissioning and provision of support for Personal Budget holders. It looks at issues for small providers and for the local authority workforce, using the example of social workers. The chapter ends with a section on how we ensure that people using Self-Directed Support can stay safe.


Chapter four, looks ahead.  It describes In Control's learning from our work with children and families and from the early work with the NHS on Personal Health Budgets. It also underlines our growing understanding of the centrality of 'community' if we are to make a success of personalisation. The chapter draws on the Partners in Policymaking programme to reflect on how we can nurture the growing social movement of citizens and families who are now demanding greater choice and control.

 

Part Two

The second part of the report provides statistical material, evaluating the impact of Self-Directed Support over the period of the report.  It includes information on both the increased take-up of Personal Budgets and on the impact on citizens' quality of life.  This part of the report concludes with information based on an in-depth study of the implementation of Self-Directed Support in the London Borough of Richmond. 

 

The report has three appendices:

  1. Risk Enablement Panel, terms of reference
  2. What some of the technical words mean.
  3. In Control membership.

 

Click here http://www.in-control.org.uk/phase3report< to obtain the report and summary

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On these pages you can find In Control's contributions to government policy.

The legislation and policies of central government make an enormous difference to people's lives. In Control tries to use the experience of all its members to inform government policy and ensure the best possible chance of creating a welfare system that will promote citizenship and encourage the development of stronger communities.

In the menu on the left, you will see a list of all the government policies in which In Control's work is referenced or which we have tried to influence with specific submissions.

You can download a report on In Control's conference, 'Don't Be Fooled by the Law' below. It contains answers to some common legal questions.

Don't be fooled by the law report.pdf<

Don’t be fooled by the Law A report from In Control, following a conference held on 1 April, 2009. lead author Andrew Tyson. Click here for more information<
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Putting People First< laid out the vision for change for social care, and stated the shared commitment of the sector leadership to achieving this. This vision is of a new social care system that helps people stay healthy and recover quickly from illness - through a focus on prevention, early intervention and enablement, and high quality personally tailored services for those who need on-going social care support. The driving force for delivery of this will be the expectations of disabled and older people, of this generation, and those of the future.

What is it?

This tool is for local councils with social services responsibilities with partners (such as mental health trusts). It aims to help them better understand what is required to transform social care systems from current models to a 'self-directed support' model that will support the delivery of the personalisation agenda. It draws on the learning so far from experience of implementing direct payments, the Individual Budget Pilot Programme and In Control. It aims to:

  • Help councils, partner agencies and organisations identify their progress to date, including achievements and areas where further scoping, planning and developmental work is required.
  • Suggest useful early activities and sources of guidance to increase their 'readiness' to embark.

This exercise fits alongside the Personalisation Toolkit which provides guidance and examples for councils embarking on transformation of their services to deliver personalisation. You can find this at www.toolkit.personalisation.org.uk<. Together with the toolkit this self-assessment tool forms an early part of the programme of support referred to in the Local Authority Circular Transforming Social Care< that followed Putting People First. It also points to a range of other sources of support and expertise, including the wealth of information and knowledge available through In Control.For similar tools relating to other aspects of transformation see www.readiness-tools.com< and the Joint Improvement Partnership<.

Completion of this tool is entirely voluntary - but we hope you find it useful. Please use the link below to get started.

Go to http://self-assess.personalisation.org.uk/csips/<

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Information for advisers

The Office for Disability Issues (ODI) has published a short guide for organisations that advise, and receive enquiries from, disabled people. The guide includes information about the Right to Control, who is eligible and contact details for each Trailblazer.

Guidance

Statutory guidance

ODI has published statutory guidance for Right to Control Trailblazers. The guidance explains the Right to Control Trailblazer regulations in more detail. It also describes how organisations should work with each other and disabled adults to deliver the Right to Control in the seven Trailblazer areas.

Good practice guidance

ODI has published guidance for the front line staff and their managers who will be delivering the Right to Control to disabled people.

The guide brings together existing good practice in personalisation and service delivery for disabled people from across the public and voluntary sector.

It may also be of use to user-led organisations based in Trailblazer areas who will support disabled people to access their Right to Control.

Community

An online community is available for Trailblazers to share information and support each other.

Evaluating the Trailblazers

In 2009, ODI commissioned a feasibility study to identify the best approach to evaluating the Right to Control.

Explore

http://odi.dwp.gov.uk/odi-projects/right-to-control-trailblazers/resourc...<

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